MAN Solicits for more Capacity Building To Support Targeted Value Chains

 

For manufacturing in Nigeria to truly succeed and play its rightful role in being a significant contributor to GDP, we must look at all aspects of the value chain – from inbound Raw material procurement all the way to sales and after-sales service by John Coumantaros, Chairman, (FMN)”

Nigeria needs a more diversified and stable alternative than oil to drive an economy that can feed and empower its growing population. Therefore, it is a well-known fact that industrialization and true inclusive economic growth cannot be achieved by focusing solely on primary products. Thus, there is need to promote the real sector of the economy to stimulate sustainable economic growth that trickles down to the betterment of the populace.

 

John Coumantaros, Chairman, the Flour Mill of Nigeria (FMN), during his a keynote delivery address on “optimizing value chain to maximize growth and competitiveness in the manufacturing sector” at the Nigeria Manufacturing and Equipment Expo (NME Expo) held at the landmark centre, Lagos said MAN must take active roles in promoting manufacturing competitiveness in the country.

 

 

Coumantaros pointed out that attraction of international investment towards building internal capacity and/or integration of Nigeria into identified supply chains adding that internal investment in skills, innovation, leap-frog technology to have a “Nigerian model” of industrial development.

He said the place of an integrated agriculture and manufacturing sector in this regard cannot be overemphasized.

While urges all stakeholders including MAN to take a critical look at the Nigerian manufacturing sector and examine how it can play a role towards Nigeria achieving a more inclusive industrial development saying The first sector that comes to mind when you review the real sector of any economy is the manufacturing sector given its role in engendering inclusive growth.

However, Coumantaros noted that the contribution of the manufacturing sector to gross domestic product (GDP) in Nigeria is low when compared to other emerging economies, a development that has been widely attributed to the country’s crude oil based, mono-product economy. Hence, there is a need to look inwards to explore ways of increasing the sector’s paltry 8.9 percent contribution to GDP, he added.

 

“Holistically, manufacturing itself is essentially the main component of all value chains. Manufacturing can be accomplished through the efficient and careful development of value chains that facilitate higher-value-added processing using locally produced inputs and services in production. For manufacturing in Nigeria to truly succeed and play its rightful role in being a significant contributor to GDP, we must look at all aspects of the value chain – from inbound Raw material procurement all the way to sales and after-sales service.”

 

While appreciating successive Federal Governments for increasingly recognizing the role of sectoral backward integration policies, which has provided incentives to look inward for inputs; as stakeholders in the private sector, I believe we (MAN) must take active roles in promoting manufacturing competitiveness in the country. For instance, due to Government’s backward integration policy and effort of key players in the Nigerian manufacturing industry, local sourcing of raw materials in Nigeria has increased from 47.2% in 2014 to 60.23% in 2018 according to a survey conducted by MAN.

FMN Boss said this discussion is coming at a very auspicious time for Nigeria as it once again transits for the end of one civilian administration to another. Following the severe economic crisis, the country suffered in 2015/16 and the recession that lingered afterwards, the country appears to be back on a positive growth trajectory. However, for this growth momentum to be sustained, and more importantly, be at levels that would result in the desired transformation of Nigeria’s economy to a path of double-digit growth, continued attention must be given to addressing the structural rigidities and other binding constraints that are faced by manufacturing and other sectors.

 

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